Refined sugar

In 1957, Dr. William Coda Martin tried to answer the question: When is a food a food and when is it a poison? His working definition of “poison” was: “Medically: Any substance applied to the body, ingested or developed within the body, which causes or may cause disease. Physically: Any substance which inhibits the activity of a catalyst which is a minor substance, chemical or enzyme that activates a reaction.”
Dr. Martin classified refined sugar as a poison because it has been depleted of its life forces, vitamins and minerals. “What is left consists of pure, refined carbohydrates. The body cannot utilize this refined starch and carbohydrate unless the depleted proteins, vitamins and minerals are present. Nature supplies these elements in each plant in quantities sufficient to metabolize the carbohydrate in that particular plant.
A daily dose of sugar causes altered internal pH levels resulting in a more acidic body. It is believed that an acidic environment is a breeding ground for disease, whereas an alkaline body promotes good health. To correct any type of imbalance, the body draws on mineral stores. For example, to protect the blood, calcium is drawn from the bones and teeth, enough to weaken bones. This precipitates osteoarthritis.
Refined sugar is lethal when ingested by humans because it provides only that which nutritionists describe as “empty” or “naked” calories. It lacks the natural minerals which are present in the sugar beet or cane.
Sugar taken every day produces a continuously over-acidic condition, and more and more minerals are required from deep in the body in the attempt to rectify the imbalance. Again, in order to protect the blood, so much calcium is taken from the bones and teeth that decay and general weakening begin.
Refined sugar will appear in product labels under other names, such as: brown sugar, corn sweetener, corn syrup, high-fructose corn syrup, malt sugar, dextrose, lactose, cane sugar, molasses.
Sources: Martin William Coda, “When is Food a Food – and when a Poison?” Michigan Organic News, 1957

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