Pete Carroll

From the Seahawks:
“Coming back to camp this year, we entered with so many issues, so many things going on,” Carroll said. “The COVID pandemic, George Floyd, social issues, political issues, so many things were at hand. It has just been an incredible offseason and camp, and now we’re finally together working. But never before this year has it been so deep and so rich in the exchanges with our players in how they’ve taken this opportunity to teach us more and deeper about what the life of a Black man is like in America—black men and women. And they’ve been compelled to speak out more than ever; there’s been less fear, less concern—I love that our environment is such that guys are willing to say what they can say and they’re OK about that, which we need to hear, because this has been a process of truth telling and reality checks that just brings me to a point where, as we’re speaking about all that’s going on—and this is about racism in America—white people don’t know enough.”

“(White people) need to be coached up and they need to be educated about what the heck is going on in the world,” Carroll said. “Black people can’t scream anymore, they can’t march any more, they can’t bear their souls anymore to what they’ve lived with for hundreds of years because white guys came over from Europe and started a new country with a great idea and great ideals and wrote down great writings and laws and all of that about democracy and freedom and equality for all. And then that’s not what happened, because we went down this road here and followed economics—rich white guys making money—and they put together a system of slavery, and we’ve never left it, really. It has never gone away.
“And Black people know the truth, they know exactly what’s going on. It’s white people who don’t know. It’s not that they’re not telling us; they’ve been telling us the stories. We know what’s right and what’s wrong, we just have not been open to listen to it. We’ve been unwilling to accept the real history. We’ve been taught a false history of what happened in this country, we’ve been basing things on false premises, and it has not been about equality for all, it has not been about freedom for all, it has not been opportunity for all, and it needs to be. This is a humanity issue we’re dealing with. This is a white people’s issue to get over and learn what’s going on and to figure it out and start loving everybody that is part of our country, and that want to our country, wherever they want to come from.”
“Our players are screaming at us,” Carroll said. “Can you see me, can you hear me? They just want to be respected, they just want to be accepted just like all of our white children and families want to be. It’s no different, because we’re all the same. There’s a lot of people who don’t see it that way, but there’s a lot of people that do, and I’m hoping that from this point forward, maybe there’s a new door to open for us, and we can walk through it together with the thought of doing what’s right. What’s right is treating people equally, we know that. Forefathers knew it. They wrote it all down, they just didn’t do it. They got caught up in making money and they figure out a way to do it, and it meant persecuting and abusing an entire race of people.
At the heart of the current discussion is police violence against Black people, a topic that came earlier this year with Breonna Taylor and George Floyd, and came up yet again last weekend with the shooting of Jacob Blake in Kenosha, Wisconsin. As safety Quandre Diggs heartbreakingly explained a day earlier, “I call my mom every day. No matter if I’m a multi-millionaire or not, she worries about me each and every day.”

“Coming back to camp this year, we entered with so many issues, so many things going on,” Carroll said. “The COVID pandemic, George Floyd, social issues, political issues, so many things were at hand. It has just been an incredible offseason and camp, and now we’re finally together working. But never before this year has it been so deep and so rich in the exchanges with our players in how they’ve taken this opportunity to teach us more and deeper about what the life of a Black man is like in America—black men and women. And they’ve been compelled to speak out more than ever; there’s been less fear, less concern—I love that our environment is such that guys are willing to say what they can say and they’re OK about that, which we need to hear, because this has been a process of truth telling and reality checks that just brings me to a point where, as we’re speaking about all that’s going on—and this is about racism in America—white people don’t know enough.”

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